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UN calls Trump a racist for ‘s***hole countries’ remark

  • UN branded President Trump’s remarks about Haiti and African nations ‘racist’ 
  • Trump questioned why the U.S. should accept immigrants from Haiti and Africa
  • He  asked why US was having ‘all these people from s***hole countries’
  • Trump said that instead, he wanted people from countries like Norway
  • The White House did not deny Trump made the comments in a statement

The United Nations has branded President Donald Trump a ‘racist’ after he reportedly called African countries ‘s***holes’.

Trump made the derogatory comments while asking members of Congress why the U.S. should accept more immigrants from Haiti and Africa, rather than places like Norway in rejecting a bipartisan immigration deal. 

U.N. human rights spokesman Rupert Colville said there was no other word that could be used to describe President Trump’s comments other than ‘racist’.

Racist: The United Nations human rights office said there was no other word that could be used to describe US President Donald Trump's comments other than 'racist'

Racist: The United Nations human rights office said there was no other word that could be used to describe US President Donald Trump's comments other than 'racist'

Racist: The United Nations human rights office said there was no other word that could be used to describe US President Donald Trump’s comments other than ‘racist’

He said: ‘If confirmed, these are shocking and shameful comments from the President of the United States. Sorry, but there is no other word one can use but racist.

‘You cannot dismiss entire countries and continents as s***holes whose entire populations, who are not white, are therefore not welcome.

‘The positive comment on Norway makes the underlying sentiment very clear.’

He continued: ‘Like the earlier comments made vilifying Mexicans and Muslims, the policy proposals targetting entire groups on grounds of nationality or religion, and the reluctance to clearly condemn the anti-semitic and racist actions of the white supremacists in Charlottesville – all of these go against the universal values the world has been striving so hard to establish since World War II and the Holocaust.

‘This is not just a story about vulgar language, it’s about opening the door wider to humanity’s worst side, about validating and encouraging racism and xenophobia that will potentially disrupt and destroy the lives of many people.

‘That is perhaps the single most damaging and dangerous consequence of this type of comment by a major political figure.’  

President Donald Trump reportedly told lawmakers Thursday in the Oval Office that he was mystified about why the U.S. imports people from 's***hole countries' in the Third World

President Donald Trump reportedly told lawmakers Thursday in the Oval Office that he was mystified about why the U.S. imports people from 's***hole countries' in the Third World

President Donald Trump reportedly told lawmakers Thursday in the Oval Office that he was mystified about why the U.S. imports people from ‘s***hole countries’ in the Third World

This image shows people walking past a street damaged by Hurricane Matthew, in Jeremie, in western Haiti. The country's perilous state had meant its citizens have temporary protected status in the U.S. - apparently one of the causes of Trump's extraordinary outburst - which is now being rescinded

This image shows people walking past a street damaged by Hurricane Matthew, in Jeremie, in western Haiti. The country's perilous state had meant its citizens have temporary protected status in the U.S. - apparently one of the causes of Trump's extraordinary outburst - which is now being rescinded

This image shows people walking past a street damaged by Hurricane Matthew, in Jeremie, in western Haiti. The country’s perilous state had meant its citizens have temporary protected status in the U.S. – apparently one of the causes of Trump’s extraordinary outburst – which is now being rescinded

Trump told senators that instead of importing immigrants from the Third World, America should seek out people from countries like Norway, whose prime minister Erna Solberg he met Wednesday at the White House

Trump told senators that instead of importing immigrants from the Third World, America should seek out people from countries like Norway, whose prime minister Erna Solberg he met Wednesday at the White House

Trump told senators that instead of importing immigrants from the Third World, America should seek out people from countries like Norway, whose prime minister Erna Solberg he met Wednesday at the White House

The African Union continental body said it was ‘frankly alarmed’ by Trump’s comments.

‘Given the historical reality of how many Africans arrived in the United States as slaves, this statement flies in the face of all accepted behavior and practice,’ AU spokeswoman Ebba Kalondo said. 

‘This is particularly surprising as the United States of America remains a global example of how migration gave birth to a nation built on strong values of diversity and opportunity.’

South Africa’s ruling African National Congress went even further and called Trump’s comments ‘extremely offensive.’ 

Trump made the comments during a meeting with members of Congress on Thursday.

‘Why are we having all these people from s***hole countries come here?’ Trump said, according to two people who were briefed on the meeting and then leaked the comment to The Washington Post.

Trump was reportedly speaking about Haitians and citizens of various African nations.   

‘Why do we need more Haitians? Take them out,’ he told people in the meeting, according to CNN.

Instead, he said, the U.S. should seek to assimilate people from countries like Norway, whose prime minister he met with a day earlier. 

CNN reported that the outburst came at the private Oval Office meeting as Democratic senator Dick Durbin outlined a bipartisan immigration deal put together by six senators which they took to Trump for backing.

Dick Durbin, the Democratic senator who is minority whip, was outlining his proposal in which the visa lottery system, of which Trump has been a fierce critic, would be ended in return for ‘temporary protected status’, known as TPS, resuming for El Salvador and Haiti.

Trump has moved to end it for immigrants from those countries but as Durbin went through a list of countries which would gain TPS under the deal, he reached Haiti and ‘Trump asked why the US wants more people from Haiti and African countries’, CNN reported.

Haiti’s government came out late Thursday and said they ‘vehemently condemn’ Trump’s comments in relation to their country.

The country’s ambassador to the US told NBC that Trump’s remarks were ‘based on stereotypes’ and the president was either ‘misinformed’ or ‘miseducated.’ 

UN CONDEMNS TRUMP AS ‘RACIST’ FOR HIS ‘S***HOLE COUNTRIES’ COMMENT

UN human rights spokesman Rupert Colville said: ‘If confirmed, these are shocking and shameful comments from the President of the United States. Sorry, but there is no other word one can use but racist.

‘You cannot dismiss entire countries and continents as s***holes whose entire populations, who are not white, are therefore not welcome.

‘The positive comment on Norway makes the underlying sentiment very clear.

‘Like the earlier comments made vilifying Mexicans and Muslims, the policy proposals targetting entire groups on grounds of nationality or religion, and the reluctance to clearly condemn the anti-semitic and racist actions of the white supremacists in Charlottesville – all of these go against the universal values the world has been striving so hard to establish since World War II and the Holocaust.

‘This is not just a story about vulgar language, it’s about opening the door wider to humanity’s worst side, about validating and encouraging racism and xenophobia that will potentially disrupt and destroy the lives of many people.

‘That is perhaps the single most damaging and dangerous consequence of this type of comment by a major political figure.’

Dick Durbin (right) was part of a bipartisan group of six senators who went to the Oval Office to seek Trump's approval for a deal which would have exchanged ending the visa lottery for resuming 'temporary protected status' for some arrivals from some countries

Dick Durbin (right) was part of a bipartisan group of six senators who went to the Oval Office to seek Trump's approval for a deal which would have exchanged ending the visa lottery for resuming 'temporary protected status' for some arrivals from some countries

Dick Durbin (right) was part of a bipartisan group of six senators who went to the Oval Office to seek Trump’s approval for a deal which would have exchanged ending the visa lottery for resuming ‘temporary protected status’ for some arrivals from some countries

Wreckage from natural disasters is endemic in nations like Haiti (pictured) and El Salvador, while African refugees from nations like Rwanda and Sudan flee oppressive governments and long-lasting civil wars between warring tribes and sects

Wreckage from natural disasters is endemic in nations like Haiti (pictured) and El Salvador, while African refugees from nations like Rwanda and Sudan flee oppressive governments and long-lasting civil wars between warring tribes and sects

Wreckage from natural disasters is endemic in nations like Haiti (pictured) and El Salvador, while African refugees from nations like Rwanda and Sudan flee oppressive governments and long-lasting civil wars between warring tribes and sects

The White House issued a needle-threading statement on immigration policy Thursday afternoon, while not denying the story’s accuracy.

‘Certain Washington politicians choose to fight for foreign countries, but President Trump will always fight for the American people,’ deputy press secretary Raj Shah said in the statement. ‘The President will only accept an immigration deal that adequately addresses the visa lottery system and chain migration – two programs that hurt our economy and allow terrorists into our country.’

‘Like other nations that have merit-based immigration, President Trump is fighting for permanent solutions that make our country stronger by welcoming those who can contribute to our society, grow our economy and assimilate into our great nation,’ Shah added. 

‘He will always reject temporary, weak and dangerous stopgap measures that threaten the lives of hardworking Americans, and undercut immigrants who seek a better life in the United States through a legal pathway.’   

IMMIGRATION FROM HAITI, AND EL SALVADOR, WHICH TRUMP CALLED ‘S***HOLES’

Haiti

Until November, Haitians had ‘temporary protected status’, or TPS, which means hey are not subject to removal even if they have no other legal status. 

It was introduced after the devastating 2010 earthquake, which shattered the country and killed 230,000 people.

But that status is ending, with the change to take effect on July 22 2019, which will force all Haitians who have the status to either find a legal way to stay or face deportation. 

The total number of people affected is estimated at 46,000 but that may be a  significant under-estimate. 

Already large numbers of Haitians have fled to Canada, generating a mini-crisis there last year as it dealt with arrivals at its border crossings. 

Haiti, however, is itself in bad shape. It is by far the poorest country in the Americas, and rated 209th poorest country in the world, out of 230 in total, putting it below Afghanistan and Ethiopia.

Unemployment is 40 per cent, and less than a third of the workforce have formal jobs, while the economy is still recovering from the latest massive natural disaster, Hurricane Mathtew, which hit in 2016.

Other statistics are also appalling: illiteracy is as high as 40 per cent, average per capita income has been estimated at $400 per person, and even though the country’s debt was canceled in 2010, it has already reached more than $2 billion, mostly owed to Venezuela.   

A mass arrival of tens of thousands from the U.S. would be doubly bad news, economists say, as there are no jobs for them and the cash from remittances which they sent has become a key part of the economy. 

El Salvador

El Salvadorans have had TPS since 2001, when an earthquake similar to Haiti’s hit an already troubled country.  

It had never truly recovered from the 12-year-long civil war which started in 1980 and killed an estimated 75,000, and January 2001’s earthquake and the mudslides it triggered caused more havoc.

The death toll was less than 1,000, but up to a quarter of a million homes and buildings were destroyed or damaged and the country lost half its economic output.

In total, an estimated 250,000 El Salvadorans are in the U.S. on TPS, compared to a population of 6.1 million – making their remittances once of the key sources of foreign cash. In total remittances from all emigrants account for a fifth of its gross domestic product.

Compared to Haiti, El Salvador is far wealthier, ranking 143rd in the world on wealth, and literacy rates are far higher, but it is scarred by gang crime which makes it one of the world’s most dangerous places.

There were 81.2 murders for every 100,000 people in 2016, the highest casualty rate outside a war zone anywhere in the world. In 2016, there were 5,200 murders.

In comparison, the U.S. had 17,25 murders in 2016, a rate of 5.3 per 100,000. The rate in Norway – where Trump welcome arrivals from – was 0.6 per 100,000 in 2015.

The most notorious in the U.S. is MS-13, which ironically originated in Los Angeles, as did its rival M-18.

Their bitter rivalry fueled the murder rate and also overshadows the criminal justice system, with police constantly in the crossfire.

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